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The Institute of Human Development (IHD)

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Diana Baumrind

Diana Baumrind

Research Psychologist
Areas: Family Socialization Project
Office: 1215 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-3603
E-mail: N/A
Curriculum Vitae
Reprint Order List

Born in 1927 in New York, elder of two daughters of an educated Jewish middle-class couple, I had strong intellectual ties to my father and uncle, sons of Eastern European immigrants, militant atheists and Marxists. As the oldest in an extended family of female cousins I inherited the role of eldest son which allowed me to participate in serious conversations, disregard gendered conventions, and mingle with articulate activists, such as Pete Seeger and Paul Robeson.

I attended Hunter College, where I fraternized with progressive instructors including philosopher John Somerville, social psychologist Bernard Riess, and anthropologist Otto Klineberg. Newly married in 1948 I left New York for graduate school at UCB where I studied developmental, clinical and social psychology with David Krech, Hubert Coffey, and Timothy Leary before he tuned in and turned on, earning my PhD in 1955. Extending my interest in leadership style from therapy groups to the family I identified the authoritative structured parental leadership style that integrates directive elements of the authoritarian style with responsive elements of the democratic style.

I chose a research career supported by multiple large grants because its flexible hours enabled me to balance care for my three daughters, political activism, and scholarship. I continue to work and work out assiduously.

Officially retired, I receive the minimal funds I need to support my work from the Jean MacFarlane fund. I am senior author of a comprehensive manuscript in the final stage of review concerning the long-term effects of preschool coercive versus confrontive power-assertive parenting that explain the differential effects of authoritarian versus authoritative parenting. I am preparing a review of the historical roots and current status of the authoritative construct with Prof. Nadia Sorkhabi. I am on the editorial board of Parenting: Science and Practice, do ad hoc reviews for several other scholarly journals and for NSF, NIH and the William T. Grant Foundation, which are among the agencies that have generously funded my work. I am a consultant for the Task Force on Corporal Punishment for the American Psychological Association. I review requests from the Henry A. Murray Center at Harvard-Radcliffe from investigators to use our case records and archival data which are housed at the Center. We are completing additional archival data for them. I am on the Executive Committee of IHD.


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Sytske Besemer

Sytske Besemer

Developmental psychologist / criminologist
Post-doctoral scholar, Rubicon Fellow
Areas: Intergenerational transmission of behavior, parenting and delinquent/problem behavior, criminal justice.
Office: 1229 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-0373
E-mail: besemer@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae
The impact of timing and frequency of parental criminal behaviour and risk factors on offspring offending

Sytske is a criminologist as well as developmental psychologist and was educated at the University of Cambridge in the UK, and both VU University Amsterdam and Leiden University in the Netherlands. She is currently a post-doctoral fellow in the Institute of Human Development investigating several topics relating to the development of delinquent and problem behavior as well as intergenerational transmission. Why do children of criminal parents have a higher risk of showing similar behavior? What is the parent’s influence? And do children influence their parents as well? What’s the impact of the criminal justice system? This research contributes to knowledge about the development of problem and criminal behavior, which can help to design interventions against such behavior.

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Margaret Bridges

Margaret Bridges

Researcher, Institute of Human Development
Research Areas: Latino Child Development Project, New Journalism on Latino Children, Decentralizing School Reforms and Social Relationships(br /> Office: 1117 Tolman Hall
Phone: (510) 642-9163
Email: mbridges@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Dr. Bridges research interests include the differential effects of preschool (and other interventions) on children from varied family backgrounds-particularly effects on their social and emotional development, as they interact with family characteristics.

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Silvia Bunge

Silvia Bunge

Associate Professor
Psychology Department
Research Interests: Cognitive neuroscience and developmental cognitive neuroscience; cognitive control and prefrontal function.
Office: 210L Barker Hall
Phone: (510) 643-0173
Email: sbunge@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Department Page

Dr. Bunge directs the Cognitive Control and Development Laboratory at UC Berkeley. Her laboratory studies how children and adults control their thoughts and actions to achieve their goals, a set of cognitive abilities known as cognitive control. The Bunge laboratory studies the neural mechanisms of cognitive control in healthy children, adolescents, and adults, as well as in several pediatric and adult patient populations. For more information, please visit the lab website: http://bungelab.berkeley.edu/

For a list of our current developmental studies, please see:
http://bungelab.berkeley.edu/Kids/index.htm

http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/education&id=6535426#bodyText

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2008/10/16_neurolaw.shtml

http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/health&id=6456067

http://www.alumni.berkeley.edu/California/200803/hardy.asp

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Joe Campos

Joe Campos

Professor (Ph.D., Cornell University)
Psychology Department
Areas: Cognitive, Developmental
Specialties: social-emotional development in infancy, especially infants' social referencing and perception of emotion; and the relation of motor development to cognitive, social, and emotional development
Office: 1233 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-9975
Email: jcampos@berkeley.edu
Department Page

The research of Professor Joseph J. Campos centers on infancy because "as the twig is bent, so is the tree inclined." Infancy is a time of origins of the basic perceptual, cognitive, emotional, and social functions of the human, so the study of infancy is fundamental to the study of man. In the lab, the studies we conduct center on what accounts for the enormous changes in the infant's responsiveness to emotional factors between five and 18 months of age, and why the infant seems to undergo a "psychological revolution" upon acquiring the onset of crawling.

Infant Studies Center Email: babycenter@berkeley.edu

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Mary Cavanaugh

Mary Cavanaugh

Assistant Research Criminologist
Research Areas: Origins of Violent Behavior in Male and Female Offenders
Office: 329 Haviland
Phone: (510) 642-8039
Email: mcavanaugh@berkeley.edu

Mary M. Cavanaugh is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Welfare at UC, Berkeley. Her primary research focuses on examining the origins of violent behavior in male and female offenders, and in designing and testing preventative interventions that may decrease the potential risk for violence in intimate relationships. She has been a practitioner in the field of family violence facilitating batterers' intervention and sexual offender programs in cooperation with Adult Probation and Parole Departments and victim service agencies.

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Norm Constantine

Norm Constantine

Clinical Professor
School of Public Health, Division of Community Health and Human Development
Areas: Adolescent health and development, research methodology, policy-oriented translational research
Specialties: Adolescent health policy, sexuality education and sexual health services, motivated reasoning, policy use and misuse of research evidence, measurement and evaluation
Office: 237 University Hall
Phone: (925) 284-8118
Email: nconstantine@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Department Page

Norm Constantine is a research psychologist focusing on adolescent health and development, measurement and research design, and the study of policy use and misuse of research evidence.

His current research program comprises two mutually supportive strands. The first involves policy-oriented translational research on adolescent sexual health issues. This entails conducting rigorous research that is systematically translated into evidence-based policy advocacy messages, materials, and supports. These are used to educate state and local policy makers and other California stakeholders about adolescent sexual health policies and practices, via direct advocacy as well as mediated advocacy involving state, local, legislative, and media partners. The second strand examines the role of social cognitive processes in research evidence use and appraisal, investigating how implicit (rapid, intuitive, and preconscious) and explicit (slow, logical, and conscious) reasoning processes are employed by policy influentials in appraising and applying research evidence, and how these processes are influenced by (and influence) prior beliefs and information, moral values and judgments, ideological commitments, and interests and obligations.

Research Projects

  1. California Adolescent Sexual Health Policy Project, funded by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  2. No Time for Complacency Adolescent Sexual Health Policy Advocacy Initiative, funded by The California Wellness Foundation
  3. California Foster Youth Sexual Health Needs Assessment, funded by the Walter S. Johnson Foundation
  4. Los Angeles Sexuality Education Initiative: School-Based Cluster Randomized Trial, funded by Planned Parenthood Los Angeles, with additional support from various foundations
  5. Evidence-Use in the Sex Education Debates Study, funded by the W. T. Grant Foundation

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Phil and Carolyn Cowan

Carolyn Pape Cowan

Carolyn Pape Cowan

Adjunct Professor of Psychology, Emerita
Researcher, Institute of Human Development
Co-Director of three longitudinal preventive intervention studies: Supporting Father Involvement, Becoming a Family, and Schoolchildren and Their Families
Areas: School Children and Their Families Project
Specialties: Establishing links between the quality of the relationship between parents and their children's development. Evaluation of preventive interventions to strengthen couple relationships, foster more effective parent-child relationships, and bolster children's development - particularly during major family transitions.
Office: 1109 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-5608
Email: ccowan@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Phil Cowan

Phil Cowan

Emeritus Professor of Psychology
Areas: Clinical, Developmental
Specialties: family systems, couple relationships, parenting styles, child cognitive and emotional development, preventive intervention
Office: 1109 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-6439
Email: pcowan@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Phil and Carolyn Cowan  have been studying the impact of couples group interventions with parents for the long-term well-being of children. Two clinical trials of couples becoming parents (Becoming a Family) and couples with a first child entering school (Schoolchildren and their Families) have been completed, each with 100, primarily middle class families. Over the last 5 years, in collaboration with colleagues at Yale and Smith College, the California Office of Child Abuse Prevention, and Family Resource Center staff in 5 California counties, they have enrolled more than 500 families from different ethnic groups (Supporting Father Involvement) in a comparison of couples groups and fathers groups. The curriculum in both approaches is focused on multiple aspects of family life and relationships. Led by trained mental health professionals, the groups have increased fathers' positive involvement in the daily lives of their children, and, as in the first two intervention studies, maintained the quality of relationship between the parents, and decreased the risk of developing behavior problems in the children.

Supporting Father Involvement
Supporting Father Involvement. In five counties in California, using a randomized clinical trial design, this project is evaluating the effectiveness of fathers groups and couples groups in low-income families. The aim of the project, now supported by results, is to increase fathers' positive involvement in the daily life of their children, to strengthen couple relationships, and to decrease the risk of developing behavior problems in the children.

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Anne E. Cunningham

Anne E. Cunningham

Professor (Ph.D., Developmental Psychology, University of Michigan)
Graduate School of Education
Research Interests:Cognition, Development, and Learning; Literacy Development; Learning Disorders and Special Education; Teacher Development, Education, and Certification
Office: 4307 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-7974
Email: acunning@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Major Research Project

Teacher Quality: The Role of Teacher Study Groups as a Model of Professional Development in Early Literacy for Preschool Teachers (Early Literacy Teacher Quality Project)): With the support of an IES grant from the Department of Education, we are developing and refining a Teacher Study Group model of professional development for preschool teachers, with a focus on early literacy. By grounding our model in the dimensions that contribute to significant changes in teachers' instructional practices and creating opportunities for rich context-driven reflection and discussions, we believe that participating teachers will be able to increase their relevant knowledge base, alter inaccurate beliefs, and thus transform their pedagogy. We expect that our iterative process of revision will generate an increasingly successful forum for preschool teachers to enhance early literacy knowledge and practices and thus emergent literacy outcomes for young low-income children.

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Ronald Dahl

Ron Dahl

Professor Public Health
Research Areas: Adolescent Brain Development; Emotion Regulation; Sleep; Behavioral and Emotional Health in Children and Adolescents; Developmental Social/Affective/Cognitive Neuroscience; Transdisciplinary Research Informing Early Intervention/Prevention and Policy
Office: 233 University Hall
Phone: (510) 643-9063
Email: rondahl@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae

Ronald E. Dahl, M.D., currently serves as Professor in the Community Health and Human Development Program and Joint Medical Program in the School Of Public health here at UC Berkeley. He is a pediatrician with long-standing research interests in the areas of sleep/arousal and affect regulation and its relevance to development of behavioral and emotional disorders in children and adolescents. His work focuses on early adolescence and pubertal maturation as a developmental period with unique opportunities for early intervention in relation to a wide range of behavioral and emotional health problems. Dr. Dahl has co-directed a large program of research focusing on child/adolescent affective disorders with more than 20 years of funding from the NIMH, and has received an NIH Independent Scientist Award focused on the interface of sleep, arousal, and affect regulation during adolescent development. His research is interdisciplinary and bridges between basic developmental research (emphasizing social and affective neuroscience) and the translation of this work into clinical and social policy relevance. He has published extensively on adolescent development, sleep disorders, behavioral/emotional health in children, and on the policy implications of this work.

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Susan Ervin-Tripp

Susan Ervin-Tripp

Professor Emeritus
Institute of Cognitive and Brain Studies, Psychology Department
Areas: Cognitive, Developmental
Specialties: pragmatics, social psychology of language use, bilingualism, developmental sociolinguistics
Office: 508 Evans
Phone: (510) 841-6803
Email: ervintripp@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Department Page

My work in the past ten years has focused on two themes: First, the relation between language use and the development of linguistic forms. The idea here is that language is learned from two sources-from the ability of children to notice forms and their meanings, including social meanings, and to structure them into grammars, and from the social occasions in which they hear and use forms, that is, what one might call the enabling conditions for language learning. Both are necessary for learning, but the relation between them has been left out of the picture. Second, the developmental changes in the structure of the interpersonal talk of children. We have been studying children's natural conversations alone with friends for both their organization and for their linguistic features in various languages and cultural settings. This work has included the study of types of talk by children such as narratives, humor, and play organizing, how these are jointly created and interwoven by conversational partners, and how the parts are indicated. Because we have studied best friends, we have also noticed differences in boys' and girls' talk. Currently, I am returning to an additional theme of my early work, bilingualism, and we have added bilingual children to our studies of the enabling conditions for language learning and of the development of the organization of talk.

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Bruce Fuller

Bruce Fuller

Professor
Policy, Organization, Measurement, and Evaluation
Research Areas: Latino Child Development Project; New Journalism on Latino Children; Decentralizing School Reforms and Social Relationships
Office: 3527 Tolman Hall
Phone: (510) 642-9163
Email: b_fuller at berkeley.edu
Websites: pace.berkeley.edu
Department Page
Explaining Teacher Turnover in Los Angeles: Two new education papers from the Institute of Human Development

Working inside policy organizations and the academy over the past three decades, Bruce Fuller has asked how public action best strengthens families and schools. Trained in political sociology, Professor Fuller's recent projects center on small-scale organizations that sprout across diverse communities, such as charter schools and preschools, which often spread in response to the clumsy or gray character of central states. Yet, decentralized institutions can disempower central governments, a worrisome scenario for those concerned with equity. Professor Fuller's current research delves into how young children are socialized in diverse Mexican-American homes, and what neighborhood organizations effectively advance their development.

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Alison Gopnik

Alison Gopnik

Professor (ph.D. Oxford University)
Head of Change, Plasticity and Development Area
Cognitive Development, Causal Knowledge and Learning, Intuitive Theories and Theory Formation , Philosophy and Psychology
Research Area: Mind and Causality Study
Office: 3317 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-2752
Email: Gopnik@berkeley.edu
Website: www.alisongopnik.com
Department Page
Curriculum Vitae

I study how young children learn about the world and other people. In particular, I formulated the "theory theory" the idea that young children learn by making up everyday theories to explain the evidence they see. More recently, I have described the theory theory computationally, using formal models of causal inference, especially Bayes nets. Currently in my lab we are exploring how children use causal inference to develop a "theory of mind".

Cognitive Development Lab

We study how children learn about the causal structure of the world. Current topics include children's understanding of personality traits, imitation and free will.

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Steve Hinshaw

Steve Hinshaw

Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles)
Areas: Clinical Science; Change, Plasticity, and Development
Specialties: Childhood behavior disorders, developmental psychopathology. Attention deficits and hyperactivity; aggressive behavior, peer relations, family interactions, and neuropsychological risk factors; psychosocial and pharmacological interventions for children with ADHD; process and outcome research in child interventions; assessment, diagnosis, and classification of child disorders; definitions of mental disorder; stigma associated with mental disorder.
Office: 3210B Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-8586
Email: hinshaw@.berkeley.edu
Department Page: http://psychology.berkeley.edu/faculty/profiles/shinshaw.html
Curriculum Vitae

Stephen Hinshaw is Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychology at UC Berkeley. He received his B.A. from Harvard and his doctorate from UCLA; he was a post-doc UC San Francisco. His work focuses on developmental psychopathology, including peer and family relationships, neuropsychological risk factors, multimodal interventions, and stigma related to mental disorder. He has directed summer research camps and conducted longitudinal studies for over 25 years. Hinshaw has authored over 200 articles, chapters, and reviews plus 7 books, including The Years of Silence are Past: My Father's Life with Bipolar Disorder, The Mark of Shame: Stigma and Mental Illness and an Agenda for Change, and The Triple Bind: Saving our Teenage Girls from Today's Pressures. The recipient of numerous grants from NIMH, he is editor of Psychological Bulletin, the most cited journal in psychology.He is a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science, American Psychological Association, and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He received the Distinguished Teaching Award, College of Letters and Sciences, UC Berkeley, in 2001.

Research Projects

  1. Young Adult Follow up of Girls with ADHD
  2. Multimodal Treatment (MTA)
  3. Stigma and Mental Illness
  4. Intervention for ADHD-Inattentive Type

Current projects focus on longitudinal follow-up of girls and boys with ADHD; family, peer, and neuropsychological risk factors; analysis of long-term effects of multimodal treatments; clinical trials of psychosocial treatment for inattentive type of ADHD; stigmatization of mental illness; mental health problems in teenage girls (and related sociocultural factors); resilience and protective factors.

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Susan D. Holloway

Susan Holloway

Professor (Ph.D., Early Education and Child Development, Stanford University)
Graduate School of Education
Research Area:Immigrant Families and Student Engagement Project; Latino Family Accommodation to Children with an Intellectual Disability Project; Japanese Women and Family Project
Office: 4309 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-7978
Email: susanholloway@berkeley.edu
Department Page
Curriculum Vitae

Susan Holloway is interested in families, culture, and schooling in the United States and Japan. She has focused much of her research on the thoughts, values and expectations of parents and other caregivers regarding the socialization and education of young children. She has also been quite interested in understanding the conditions and experiences that contribute to women's sense of personal satisfaction and perception of efficacy as a parent. Her work on schooling has focused on the conditions that contribute to low-SES children's engagement in school and their academic achievement within diverse sociocultural groups. She has also examined the experiences of young children in a variety of early education settings in the U.S. and abroad. Recently, she has been engaged in research on the structural and psychological processes characterizing the daily lives of families who have a child with a cognitive disability, with a particular focus on Latinos.

Her most recent book is Women and Family in Contemporary Japan, published by Cambridge University Press in 2010. The book focuses on women's experience of parenting in Japan, tracking shifting discourses about mothers and parenting from early modern into contemporary times and exploring the ways in which current social conditions shape women's perceptions of their role and support -- or undermine -- their sense of competence .

Dacher Keltner

Dacher Keltner

Professor, Psychology Department (Stanford University)
Co-Director of the Greater Good Science Center
Areas: Social/Personality; Change, Plasticity & Development
Specialties: Social/Personality: emotion; social interaction; individual differences in emotion; conflict and negotiation; culture
Office: 3210 Tolman
Phone: 510-642-5368
Email: keltner@socrates.berkeley.edu
Department Page

My own studies have focused on the social functions of emotion, arguing that emotions enable individuals to respond adaptively to the problems and opportunities that define human social living. I am also exploring the determinants of power and status. My final research interest lies in the study of how humans negotiate moral concerns

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Jonas Langer

Professor Emeritus, Psychology Department (Ph.D., Clark University)
Research Area: Cognitive and Neuro-Developmental Longitudinal Project
Specialties: cognitive development in infancy and early childhood, primate cognition
Office: 1127 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-6629
Email: jlanger@berkeley.edu
Department Page

My research on the evolution and development of cognition in human and nonhuman primates is currently expanding from two- to three-pronged. The first studies the origins and development of physical (e.g., causal), logical (e.g., classificatory), arithmetic (e.g., numerical) cognition in humans from early infancy on. The second studies the comparative development of these cognitions in humans, chimpanzees, and monkeys. The third, which is entirely new and just beginning, studies the maturation of brain activity (using fMRI measures) in 4 to 18 year old humans that attends their central conceptual development (e.g., of quantitative conservation judgments and of proportional reasoning).

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Na'ilah Suad Nasir

Na'ilah Suad Nasir

Na'ilah Suad Nasir, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education & African American Studies
Research Area: Culture and Development, Equity, Race, Mathematics Learning; The Influence of Culture and Race on Learning, Achievement, and Educational Trajectories
Office: 5641 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-5547
Email: nailahs@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Professor Na'ilah Suad Nasir's research centers on how issues of culture and race influence the learning, achievement, and educational trajectories of African American and other non-dominant students in urban school and community settings. She is interested in the intertwining of social and cultural contexts (cultural practices, institutions, communities, societies) and the learning and educational trajectories of individuals, especially in connection with inequity in educational outcomes.

Major Research Projects

Learning and Identity in Juvenile Halls Schools: In this line of work, Nasir is examining processes of schooling and identity for incarcerated youth.

Racial Stereotypes and Math Learning: In this set of studies, Nasir is focusing on the ways that upper elementary and middle school students understand and/or endorse racial stereotypes about who can do math, and the relation between stereotype endorsement and a range of outcomes.

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Larry Nucci

Larry Nucci

Research Educator
Areas: Adolescence, Child Development, Moral and Ethical Studies, School Culture, Social and Emotional Development
Office: 4609 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-6922
Email: nucci@.berkeley.edu
Department Page
Curriculum Vitae

Larry Nucci studies children's social and moral development. An aspect of his work has focused on children's judgments about issues they consider to be personal matters of privacy and discretion. This research has been carried out in a number of contexts including Latin America and Asia. Findings from this research have broad implications for parenting and educational practice. He is Senior Editor of the journal Human Development and a member of the editorial board of Cognitive Development. He was a Fulbright Scholar and serves in an advisory capacity to several organizations concerned with children's moral and character education including the Character Education Partnership, The Council for Spiritual and Ethical Education, and the US Department of Education.

Prior to coming to UC Berkeley, he was a Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Illinois at Chicago where he currently holds the title of Emeritus Professor, and continues as the co-Director of the Office for Studies in Moral and Social Development and Education.

Current Research Project

The development of morality and compassionate love in children (with Elliot Turiel): Funding, Fetzer Foundation

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Liz Owens

Liz Owens

Research Psychologist
Areas: Clinical Child Psychology
Specialties: Developmental psychopathology; attention deficits and hyperactivity in children, including home-and-school-based behavioral treatments; randomized clinical trials for the treatment of childhood mental illness; parenting skills and styles.
Office:1225 Tolman Hall
Phone: (510) 642-1985
Email: lizowens@berkeley.edu

I have been a research scientist at IHD for 10 years, previously receiving my B.A. in biology from Stanford University and my M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Pittsburgh. I work primarily on two projects: a long-term longitudinal study of girls with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and a randomized clinical trial for children with inattentive-type ADHD. On both projects I serve as a statistical consultant and data analyst. On the latter, I also serve as the licensed clinical psychologist, working with parents individually and in groups, as well as providing consultation to teachers. In addition to my interests in ADHD, I am interested in the development of externalizing problems in young children, resilience among children at risk for developing psychopathology, and the effects of maternal depression on children.

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Jane P. Perry

Jane P. Perry

Researcher
Email: jpperry@berkeley.edu

Creating a Classroom of Inquiry at the University of California at Berkeley: The Harold E. Jones Child Study Center

Humans by their very nature are storytelling creatures, conveying essential meanings about themselves and their worlds through gestures, words, and cadenced utterances. I am an ethnographer, conveying in narrative format what it means to be children and teachers out on the playground, to be finally alone in a busy household, to use children's peer play culture as a subtext to their story dictations, and to learn in a play-based classroom. I guest lecture and conduct workshops on children's peer play culture and the negotiated learning experience between that culture and the teaching culture, especially outdoors and through children's own narratives.

Through a collage of participant observations, audio recordings, dreams, and text I also write poetry and short stories, and produce audio story collages.

Current Research Project

Jane's current project is Children Making Sense of their World: Creating a Classroom of Inquiry, co-authored with Barbara Scales and Rebecca Tracy, where they present an Interpretive Approach drawn from their teaching, research, and administrative experience at the University of California's Harold E. Jones Child Study Center. The authors present a framework and a language for a classroom of inquiry that is play-based and emphasizes observing, interpreting, and adjusting the environment in order to guide learning from the children's point of view. Children Making Sense of their World re-conceptualizes the concept of learning centers in classrooms as social ecologies, where teachers use the dialogue of the classroom to "paint a picture" and analyze learning events by focusing on child-directed play inside and outdoors, circle time, and small group learning activities. Children Making Sense of their World illustrates teaching strategies that encourage children to solve problems and experience competence in all curriculum areas including active outdoor play.

Jane has a journal article, Creating a Classroom of Inquiry: The University of California Berkeley Harold E. Jones Child Study Center, under review by Early Education and Development.

www.redroom.com/author/jane-p-perry

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Geoff Saxe

Geoff Saxe

Professor (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley)
Graduate School of Education
Specialization: Child Development, Cognitive Development, Cultural Studies, Mathematics Education
Office: 4315 Tolman Hall
Phone: (510) 643-6627
Email: saxe@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Cultural development of mathematical ideas: Papua New Guinea studies

Geoffrey Saxe is a Professor in the Graduate School of Education at  the University of California, Berkeley.  Earning his Ph.D. in  Psychology (cognitive development) from UC Berkeley in 1975, Professor  Saxe has held postdoctoral and faculty positions at Children's  Hospital/Harvard Medical School (1976-1977), The Graduate Center of  the City University of New York (1977-1981), UCLA (1981-1997). He is  past Editor-in-Chief of the journal, Human Development, and has served  on the editorial boards for various journals, including Cognition and  Instruction, Cognitive Development, and the Journal of Applied  Developmental Psychology. He is an elected to the National Academy of  Education, and he has been selected as a Fellow at the Center for  Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University,  Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center, and he serves on the  advisory board of the Glen Lean Ethnomathematics Centre, University of  Goroka, Papua New Guinea. He serves or has served on various standing committees and task forces and review panels for private and public  foundations, including the Institute of Education Sciences, the Spencer Foundation, the National Science Foundation, the OERI, and the National Institutes of Mental Health. Professor Saxe has published empirical articles, monographs, and book on issues on the development of mathematical thinking both in and out of school contexts.

Funded by the Institute of Education Sciences, Professor Saxe's current empirical work is focused on the development of a research-based curriculum unit on integers and fractions, informed by interview, tutorial, and classroom-based studies. He is also completing a book on the Social History of Number-Studies in Papua New Guinea.

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Dan Slobin

Dan Slobin

Professor Emeritus (Ph.D., Harvard University)
Departments of Psychology and Linguistics, Institute of Cognitive and Brain Science, Institute of Human Development
Specialties: psycholinguistics, sociolinguistics, language and cognitive development, sign language, cross- cultural
Research Area: Child Language Sign Language Acquisition Project
Office: 4203 Tolman
Phone: (510) 643-7807
Email: slobin@berkeley.edu
Curriculum Vitae
Department Page

Dan Slobin describes himself as "a cognitive/functional psycholinguist who explores the interfaces between child language, cognition, and linguistic typology." He began his career at Harvard's Center for Cognitive Studies in the early sixties, being shaped by the emerging "cognitive revolution," and receiving a PhD in social psychology in 1964. Since then he's been at the University of California at Berkeley, carrying out research on child language development in a crosslinguistic and cross-cultural perspective. His research sites include the U.S., Turkey, Israel, Croatia, Spain, and the Netherlands, conducting research on early child language in a range of spoken and signed languages. His students and collaborators have carried out child language research in dozens of countries. A major focus of his work is to study how languages differ in their mappings between concepts and linguistic forms and to explore ways in which such differences may influence "thinking for speaking. In recent years he has become especially concerned with typological/functional linguistics and with the manual/visual modality of sign language and co-speech gesture. Since 1997 he has been collaborating with Nini Hoiting, at the Royal Institute for the Deaf in the Netherlands, on linguistics and acquisition of Sign Lanuage of the Netherlands.

In 2004 Slobin became a Professor Emeritus of Psychology and Linguistics and a Professor of the Graduate School at UC Berkeley. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Linguistic Society of America. He is a past recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professorship in Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies at Berkeley.

 

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Laura Sterponi

Laura Sterponi

Associate Professor
Graduate School of Education
Areas: Language and Literacy, Society and Culture
Office:5643 Tolman Hall
Phone: (510) 642-0287
Email: sterponi@berkeley.edu
Website: http://gse3.berkeley.edu/faculty/lsterponi/website

Merging her graduate degree training in developmental psychology (Ph.D., 2002) and in applied linguistics (Ph.D., 2004), Laura Sterponi has developed a research program that is centrally concerned with the role of language and literacy practices in children's development and education.

As a developmental psychologist, Sterponi has always been interested in discerning the sociocultural underpinnings of learning processes. The cognitive capabilities that our neurological apparatus enables us as human beings to attain do not pre-exist and are never abstracted from the social practices in which they develop and are deployed. Cognitive structures are outcomes of social interaction; and mental growth manifests in forms of competencies that are culturally organized and context specific. As an applied linguist, Sterponi is drawn to study language, oral and written, both as a central means of learning and as a critical target of cultural transmission. In fact, she sees learning through language and learning language as inseparable dimensions of the process of developing sociocultural competencies. Thus, her research explores the interface between culture and cognition in language and literacy practices across learning contexts. Within this general scope, she has developed three main strands of research: (1) children's socialization into moral reasoning and discourse (2) reading as psychological process and social practice and (3) language practices in autism.

Sterponi's research toolkit is comprised of ethnographic and discourse analytic methods. She focuses on spontaneously occurring interaction in various social contexts, employing systematic and extended video-recording of focal practices. Through analysis of language structures and sequential organization of interaction she then discerns the interplay between sociocultural determinations and individual agency in development and education.

 

Her work has been published in Discourse Studies (2003, 2004), Childhood (2009), Journal of Child Language (2013), Human Development (2001), Linguistics and Education (2007), Text and Talk (2008).

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Ann Wakeley

Ann Wakeley

Research Coordinator
Research Area: Cognitive and Neuro-Development Longitudinal Project
Office:2425 Atherton St.
Phone: (510) 642-7032
Email: awakeley@berkeley.edu

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Julia Walsh

Julia Walsh

School of Public Health
Area: Child health in developing countries, cost-effectiveness & cost-benefit of of health interventions, prematurity and low birth weight among hispanics.
Office: University Hall 207L
Phone: (510) 642-1629
Email: jwalsh@berkeley.edu
Department Page

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Rhona S. Weinstein

Rhona S. Weinstein

Professor Emerita and Professor of the Graduate School (Ph.D., Yale University)
Area: Clinical Science
Specialties: Community psychology (children, schools, and community settings): Classroom/school processes and the development of competence; expectations about ability and self-fulfilling prophecies; educational equity,school reform, and the prevention of school failure.
Office: 2107A Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-2055
Email: rhona_weinstein@berkeley.edu
Department Page

Rhona S. Weinstein is Professor Emerita of Psychology and Professor of the Graduate School at University of California, Berkeley, where she was formerly director of the Clinical Science Program and Psychology Clinic. Weinstein's research focuses first, on the contextual and multi-layered dynamics of academic expectations and self-fulfilling prophecies, as they impact educational opportunities and the development of minority and poor children, and second, on school reform for educational equity. Weinstein has been involved since its inception in Berkeley's efforts, in collaboration with Aspire Public Schools, to create an early college secondary school for "first in the family to go to college" youth (CAL Prep) which opened its doors in August 2005.  

Research Projects

  1. Longitudinal studies of teacher expectancy effects: moderators and mediators (with Christine Rubie-Davies, University of Auckland, New Zealand, and Phil and Carolyn Cowan, UCB)
  2. The implementation of small group advisories in a high-expectation middle school (with Nilofar Sami and Zena Mello)
  3. An examination of the first three years of an early college secondary school.

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Fei Xu

Fei Xu

Professor (Ph.D., MIT)
Psychology Department
Areas:Statistical inference in infants and young children in cognitive development, language acquisition, and social cognition. Specific research focuses on object individuation, number concepts, word learning, and physical and psychological reasoning.
Office: 3423 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-3344
E-mail: fei_xu@berkeley.edu
Website: http://babylab.berkeley.edu/
Department Page

Our research focuses on how infants and children learn in various domains of inductive learning. Children are remarkable in learning rapidly and accurately even when they only have sparse data. We want to understand the learning mechanisms that support such learning. We take a rational constructivist approach to study development, and we are interested in investigating how domain-general mechanisms are applied to gain domain-specific knowledge in intuitive physics, intuitive psychology, and word learning.

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Qing Zhou

Qing Zhou

Assistant Professor
Psychology Department
Research Area:Developmental psychopathology, with an emphasis on the roles of temperament, emotion-related processing, and family socialization in the development of child and adolescent psychopathology and competence; cultural influences on socio-emotional development; Kids and Family Project, New Beginnings Projject
Office: 3210 Tolman
Phone: (510) 642-2151
E-mail: qingzhou@berkeley.edu
Department Page